SkyDrive for iOS gets automatic Camera Roll back-up…

SkyDrive – Microsoft’s very own personal cloud storage solution, has been quite a pleasant experience since its conception over 6 years ago. At the time, SkyDrive was more of an experimental service to separately sign up for. In April, 2012, SkyDrive became available for every single Microsoft account whether you use it or not, and is now deeply integrated into Windows 8. Sure, it doesn’t seem any better on non-Windows systems than other cloud storage system, until now. SkyDrive for iOS has brought forth a much needed feature – for me, at least.

Kernel 3.12 – A must upgrade to your Linux kernel…

Linux Kernel 3.12 has been released recently and is a stable kernel, meaning it is utterly safe to upgrade to. Kernel 3.12 comes with far more than simple bug fixes. It is pretty much comes with features that will revamp your system performance-wise from the ground up.

Kernel 3.12

Login warnings for Windows…

We don’t give much credit to Windows for all of the abilities it endows. Hidden features in Windows are rarely known because of the caution one exercises in keeping their system software from breaking down – something they believe too much meddling might cause. You’re lucky to have us, though. We meddle with our systems all the time and hardly do we fear losing important data – we back up, by the way. Good practice, this backing up thing. So, here we are tapping into our reserve to bring you a not-well-hidden and yet not-well-looked-for feature on Windows – the ability to have login warnings.

Mission Control freedom – Mavericks observations…

Mission Control was a feature added in Mac OS X Lion as an upgrade to the Exposé feature that was introduced in 10.3 Panther. It was done to accommodate Lion’s full screen apps. It simply brings forth every single open app in one screen. All the full screen apps, along with the Desktop workspaces and the Dashboard are lined on the top of the screen and the closest Desktop apps occupy the major portion of the rest. Exposé now only exists as a vestige that can be invoked on a per app basis by adjusting the option in the trackpad settings.

Gesture updates – Mavericks observations…

Gestures have become an important form of interacting with your Mac, ever since Apple introduced multitouch for the trackpad. It started with a simple collection of two finger gestures – spread and pinch to zoom in and out, secondary click and two finger pan – as well as redefining a few single touch gestures. Of course, as time passed they crammed in room for more fingers. We’ll not go that deep into it. Mavericks doesn’t really differ that much from Mountain Lion in terms of gestures. The real updates have happened to the interpretation of these gestures.

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